Photo by Apassionata [CC BY-SA 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Where We’ve Been: Song I – desolate drinking song, full of despair. Song II – Loneliness in autumn. Song III – fluffy nostalgia piece that looks backwards to the past.

This song is one of the most interesting ones in the whole cycle, because it’s one of those poems that you can read a lot of metaphors into, depending on how philosophical you want to get. As always, have a look at the words first (or even better, follow along with them as you listen):

http://www.lieder.net/lieder/get_text.html?TextId=20687

The picture is very simple. Young maidens sit by the river picking flowers, and the first half of the poem is taken up with a picturesque description of the location and the girls.

But the turning point is when the young men come along, including one who has a runaway horse that tramples the horses of the young girls.

The interesting part in all this is where the maiden turns to watch him go, feigning a “proud demeanour” but really giving him “long, yearning glances”. Is this just a piece of romance? Or is it a deeper message that the people we love will trample and destroy our lives to some extent? Is it saying that we love them because we know they hurt us?

The honest answer is that I’m not sure, and nor am I sure that having a complete psychological explanation would make me enjoy it any more. But what we can perhaps all agree is that this contrast between the destructive nature of the boys and the delicate work of the girls, and the romance this inspires, is the heart of the poem. And Mahler has captured it perfectly in this song, which is sung by the baritone this time.

(0:00) The beginning is very “pretty” – lots of flute, in other words, as the girls are described picking their flowers.

(2:46) I always feel like this is a rip-off of the 1812 Overture, as the boys ride through on horses. (Though don’t take my word on that.) But it’s definitely the loudest part in the whole work, and almost impossible for any singer to really manage, as the music gallops faster than the singer can keep up.)

(6:13) The most beautiful moment in the whole work is the ending, where the girl looks longingly after the young man who has destroyed everything she has worked on – gorgeous woodwinds, high strings and a gentle fade out at the end.

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2 thoughts on “The Mahler Symphonies Guided Tour: Das Lied von der Erde IV – Of Beauty

  1. The interesting thing about those old WB cartoons is that back in the 40s when they came out, classical music was a lot more mainstream. So you wouldn’t have to have been a fairly sophisticated audience-goer back in 1943 when that cartoon came out to recognise that the Minah bird is trotting along to a slightly cock-eyed variation on Mendelssohn’s Hebrides Overture (or the Fingal’s Cave Overture as it’s more commonly known).

    The story goes that Mendelssohn went to Scotland and visited the jaw-dropping natural wonder of Fingal’s Cave (a rock formation) and it was so evocative to him that he created this overture 11-minute overture to recreate the experience. It’s quite an amazing piece of music and instantly recognisable:

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